If you like bell peppers, you also know how good they are for you.

And knowing that, and how some vegetables can be so good for your puppy, you might also wonder if bell peppers aren’t also one of those veggies.

Or are peppers bad for your dog?

That’s what you’re going to find out in this post. Whether canines can indeed consume capsicum.

And if they can, can they eat all the different varieties…red, orange, yellow and green?

Capsicum is naturally healthy. There are, however, some things you should know before feeding them to your pup.

You can’t put it past a dog to eat just about anything. Just because they eat it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s good for them. They don’t always know good from bad.

So as the owner, it’s pretty much your responsibility to research whether anything your dog has eaten, or wants to eat, is ok or toxic for them.

So without further ado, let’s find out if bell peppers are bad for dogs, or it’s ok for you to add them to your pup’s diet…

Are Bell Peppers Bad for Dogs?

Short answer? No…

Bell peppers can in fact be quite good for your puppy, as they are for us peope.

Their low calorific value relative to their micronutrient content makes them a nice, healthy snack to munch on.

Bell peppers contain:

  • Beta-carotene
  • Vitamin C
  • Folate
  • Vitamins A, E and K
  • Certain B vitamins
  • Manganese
  • Phosphorus
  • Magnesium
  • Fiber
  • Antioxidants

The antioxidants are especially good, since they help combat cancer. They’re also good for older dogs, helping reduce joint pain in case they have arthritis.

The crunchiness of bell peppers is down to their good fiber and water content, which aids digestion. They can help reduce flatulence if your pup has an upset stomach.

And to add to all that, it’s also said that capsicum helps improve circulation. Clearly it’s winning all the way with these colourful veggies!

But Surely There’s Something as Too Many Peppers for My Dog?!

Of course!

Too much of anything is bad for you. And that goes for your pup too, of course.

And since dogs are primarily built to eat meat and other non-veggy things, an overload of vegetables in their diet can cause an upset tummy, with some bloating and flatulence. Maybe even some diarrhea.

And when we’re talking of peppers here, we don’t include the spicy ones! Those kinds of peppers are bad for your pooch!

Dogs aren’t used to spicy food, and it’s bound to mess up their digestion.

Are Green Bell Peppers Bad for Dogs?

Yes! Crunchy green capsicum is a great treat for your pooch in between meals.

They are rich in vitamin C, which boosts immunity. And they also have a good amount of beta-carotene.

Beta-carotene is really good for your dog since it helps prevent cancer, keeps eyesight problems at bay and also helps fight inflammations!

That last part is especially good for older dogs who suffer from or are at risk of contracting arthritis.

What About the Red Ones? Are Red Peppers Bad for Dogs?

On the contrary, red peppers might just be the best of the lot!

Compared to the other varieties – green or yellow – the red once tend to have a higher concentration of essential micronutrients.

We’re talking about carotenoid phytonutrients, beta-carotene, antioxidants and vitamins A & C.

That’s basically the only difference between red peppers and the others. The red ones have a higher nutrient value.

How to Feed Your Dogs Bell Peppers

You may feed peppers to your dog in a variety of ways – cooked or raw, as long as whatever’s in the recipe isn’t bad for them.

Raw peppers are crunchy and most dogs would love that. But if your puppy doesn’t, don’t be too disappointed. Chewing on veggies can be weird for a dog.

In such cases, you can chop and cook them before adding a bit to their meals. Or you might even puree them.

Just make sure you check with your vet about the quantity that’s ok to give to your dog each day. You don’t want your puppy getting diarrhea.

Also do note that when feeding your pup raw bell peppers, fully ripened ones are best.

We hope we answered your question are peppers bad for your dog with this post. If you have any other inputs from your own experiences with your dog, do let us know in the comments section below!