5 Simple Tips for Using Pee Pads for Cats at Home

Yes, you read that right…

Pee pads for cats really are a thing.

Well, they’re pretty much the same as puppy pads. But you wouldn’t call them puppy pads for cats, now would you.

“Why is my cat peeing on everything but the litter box?!!”

If you’re lucky, you’re never going to wonder that ever as a cat owner.

Unfortunately, a lot of cat owners do.

Cats are normally very particular about keeping themselves clean – almost to a fault.

But that doesn’t mean your cat will bother keeping your house clean.

Of course not.

Especially not when the reason why your cat is peeing on the floor is a medical problem, or a behavioral one.

1. Use Pee Pads for Cats When Your Cat Refuses to Use the Litter Box

Possible Reasons Why Your Cat is Peeing All Over the House

Before getting into the best ways to use cat training pads, you should know why your cat may need them.

A common mistake many owners make when their cat is peeing in the house – and not in the litter box – is to assume it’s a behavioral problem.

That’s jumping the gun, a little bit, don’t you think?

It may not be her fault at all!

That’s jumping the gun, a little bit. It may not be her fault at all!

Your cat may be avoiding the litter box for a variety of reasons, ranging from:

  1. Medical: illnesses such as Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), crystals or stones and intestinal cystitis do affect a cat’s ability to control her bladder.
  2. Stress: Is there a new pet or guest at home? Or is it an entirely new home? A strange animal outside? Stress can be caused by a variety of reasons, differing from cat to cat.
  3. Behavioral: Although this is often directly linked to stress, but behavioral problems can occur naturally. Especially if you have two or more tom cats at home who must share territory and things.
  4. Old age: Incontinence in old age can get almost anyone, us people too, unfortunately. You can’t do much, except make things easier for her, say by using more accessible litter boxes along with cat potty pads.

Where Pee Pads for Cats Come in Handy – 5 Tips For Using Cat Pee Pads in Various Situations

If your cat’s situation falls under any of the above four situations, you might be having trouble fixing it.

…And wondering how often do cats pee anyway (2-4 times a day on average).

Why, you ask?

Well, training cats is not a very straightforward thing.

And that’s why having a stack of absorbent pee pads for cats in such times can be a major help.

For instance, training pads for cats help some to transition smoothly to the litter box they didn’t like days ago. Potty pads for cats who have trouble with their aim can be a blessing for owners.

And get this:

Cat wee wee pads are useful at any age – be it training your kitten, or easing things for your geriatric old tabby who has trouble getting into the litter box.

4. Pet Pee Pads for Cats Who Don’t Like to Use the Litter Box Too Much

1. Use Pee Pads for Cats When Your Cat Refuses to Use the Litter Box

Don’t you hate it when your cat likes to pee on the floor or carpet?

Or he plain dislikes using the litter box?

Using pet pads for cats helps deal with cleaning and transitioning much better. It’s crucial to remove all scent and clean thoroughly at the place of the accident unless you’re fine with repeats.

Good pee pads for cats help with that with their high absorbency and odor fighting properties.

Make sure you have the right size and kind of litter box and litter – fluff such as perfumed litter or self-cleaning boxes are rarely helpful.

But that’s not all:

You can use the cat pee pad for helping your kitty transition from his spot on the floor to the litter box.

Once you know there’s nothing wrong with them, you can gradually move the cat pee pad from his preferred spot, inch by inch over days or weeks – don’t rush – to the litter box.

Dabbing the pad with a bit of his pee or stool should clue him into using the pad if he’s initially reluctant.

2. Using Pee Pads for Cats Who Like to Spray Everywhere to Mark Territory

2. Using Pee Pads for Cats Who Like to Spray Everywhere to Mark Territory

You might be wondering:

Why do cats pee on things sometimes, and not on the floor?

The answer is quite straightforward:

It’s their way of marking territory and isn’t just restricted to tom cats.

And not just males…

Female cats may also engage in spraying if you own more than one cat and there’s competition at home (however needless) for food, spots or your affection.

In this cases, taping a cat pee pad to the wall where they normally tend to spray and mark can save you trouble a lot of (and stink).

3. Wee Wee Pads for Cats Who Tend to Miss the Litter Box

3. Wee Wee Pads for Cats Who Tend to Miss the Litter Box

Many of you have been there…

Cleaning up the messes your silly little kitty makes even while she’s using the litter box.

You should keep checking if your cat litter box is big enough as she’s growing up. If it isn’t, she may well find it too tough, or impossible to relieve herself within its confines.

On the other hands, some cats tend to aim poorly or not at all – they just go wherever they find litter or dirt beneath their feet.

For such scoundrels, having a large size potty pad – or several small ones covering the area beyond the edges of the litter box where your cat tends to spill over is a helpful way to manage the mess.

…At least until you get a better box.

4. Pet Pee Pads for Cats Who Don’t Like to Use the Litter Box Too Much

Some cats are so finicky, they refuse to use an already soiled litter box.

Trust me, it can drive you nuts.

Especially if you’re running low on litter. Or simply don’t have enough time to change it 2-3 times a day.

For these little prudes, you can choose to have extra reliving spots with the help of cat wee wee pads.

Choose spots away from the general living area that your cat is comfortable relieving in for the pet pads. Problem solved!

Pee Pads for Cats Who are Too Old, Sick or Injured to Use the Litter Box5. Pee Pads for Cats Who are Too Old, Sick or Injured to Use the Litter Box

You might not have thought of this…

But pee pads for cats can be really helpful in one more, really important way:

If your cat is injured, sick, or even recovering from a surgery of some sort, using the litter box can be literally a pain for him.

For instance, declawing causes a lot of pain for cats, leaving their feet sensitive to the lightest touches for a good while after the procedure.

Not getting into the long-term harms and consequences of declawing, it makes life hard immediately after in any case. In such and other similar situations, including older cats, use cat pee pads as substitutes for the litter box.

They’re a sensible alternative, at least when you can’t possibly rush your kitty outside each time she has to go.

Also, pee pads for cats, being white or at least light in color, help spot anything strange about your cat’s pee or stool immediately.

Pee and stool are in many cases a good indicator of any sickness or internal injuries, so you can flag it to the vet ASAP.

And if you’re wondering which pee pads to get for your cat, or whether puppy pads are good enough for cats, you don’t have to look further. Bulldogology’s Premium Training Pads are good for puppies and cats interchangeably. These multi-layered pads with high absorbency and odor blocking will do the job for your cat’s business just as well.

And while the adhesive sticky tapes may not hold in place if your cat has the tendency to bury her waste, using the pads in a container much like a litter box is an excellent safeguard against potential messes.

So give these a go as your cat training pads, and let us know what you think! And if you have any tips or suggestions of your own, do let us know in the comments section below!